Color Preference in Orchid Bees

Andreia and Aimee attended the first all virtual Animal Behavior Society meeting last week. It was really great to have a chance to see all the talks asynchronously, so neither of us missed anything we wanted to watch. The challenging part of the talks for everyone was fitting a presentation into only six minutes!

Andreia summed things up well:

And here is Andreia’s talk if you’d like to hear a little bit about her dissertation work on orchid bees.

Congrats to Dr. Matt Austin

Former grad student Matthew Austin successfully defended his dissertation, giving a wonderful talk describing some of his research during his five years at UMSL. He’s finishing up the final changes to his dissertation, and is starting his postdoctoral fellowship with the Living Earth Collaborative at Washington University, where he will also be doing research at the Missouri Botanic Gardens.

We managed a drive-by celebration at his house later in the day. Hopefully we can have a belated in person celebration later this year.

Jose Antonio from the Parker Lab got a great screen shot at the end of the talk.

2019 in Review

Lots of hard work paid off for lab members this year. And since we’ve not been great about updating the lab news, this will be a post with lots of news.

Matt Austin received a full year Dissertation Fellowship, that started in the fall, and Andreia Figueiredo was awarded a Raven Fellowship that will allow her to spend the spring semester in the field.

Many successful grants were written! Undergrads Katelyn Hanners, Dannice Alexander, and Brittany Alexander were all awarded grants from the Harris Center for their work on bees. Andreia was awarded a grant from the St. Louis Zoo for her work on orchid bees. And Rachel Brant was awarded grants from the Harris Center and the Webster Groves Nature Study Society for her work on sweat bees.

Lots of data were collected! Tian Manning completed her experiment on colony learning in bumble bees, with a monumental effort from Brittany, Dannice, high school student Kamau MuseMorris, plus many others. Matt brought a long-running bumble bee experiment on producer-scrounger dynamics to a close, completing efforts started by former student Isabel Rojas-Ferrer. Rachel finished her first season of data collection on sweat bees in community gardens and in the prairie, with help from Katelyn, Moses Alshimary, and a drone. Matt finished his field work for his dissertation, and buckled into genetics and modeling. Andreia completed her second field season in Florida, with some great lab work in St. Louis from Jacob Kottmeier, and high school senior Sindhu Bala. Fly work continues, with Michael Austin learning more about costs of learning in our evolved lines, undergrad Logan Philpott collecting some nice data on spider predation on high learning flies, welcoming three interns into the fly world (Candice Krull, Carly Spielberg, and Jacob Ryno, who have been learning lots of techniques), and last, but definitely not least, Jill Lee completing all the data collection on her thesis on overshadowing in learning.

It was a good year for pollinator outreach! Our reworked table kit was a success at the 13th Street Community Garden and North City Farmer’s Market during Pollinator Week. Aimee taught classes for two rounds of the Master Pollinator Steward Certificate, and the Master Naturalists. We hosted many lab tours. And last, but not least, we contributed a graphic on pollinator conservation for the Pollinator Pantry brochure from the St. Louis County Parks.

And finally, a number of papers made it into press, including Matt’s paper in American Naturalist on size size and bumble bee range changes. Tian presented her first poster ever at the Animal Behavior Society conference, along with a poster from Rachel and a great talk from Matt. Andreia, Matt, and Rachel all presented posters at the Entomological Society of America meeting. And Aimee gave talks at Animal Behavior and at the European Society for Evolutionary Biology.

Corny Time for All

We decided to celebrate the fall by visiting a corn maze, and for those who could make it, we consumed large quantities of kettle corn, petted some animals, and destroyed pumpkins using slingshots and a cannon. Notably we did not get lost in the corn and no actual pain was caused by reading the “Cornundrums” placed throughout the maze.

Our intrepid team. Andreia and Rachel on the higher hay bales, and Matt, Itachi, and Aimee below.
We didn’t get lost.
We never found all the CORNundrums throughout the maze… and we weren’t going back in either.

On preparedness in pollination

Aimee gave a talk at the European Society of Evolutionary Biology meeting in Turku, Finland on something that she and Andreia have been working on. It was part of a really great symposium on eco-evo feedbacks in pollination. The whole symposium is on YouTube, but here’s a link to Aimee’s talk.

Let Aimee and Andreia know if you have any thoughts! Andreia is working on a manuscript on preparedness in pollination right now with Aimee, and Aimee is working on a manuscript on the evolution of preparedness with Andreia.